Emma R. Rogers
(1855-1943)

 

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Spouses/Children:
Walter Wharton Gunn

Emma R. Rogers

  • Born: 30 Nov 1855, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah
  • Marriage: Walter Wharton Gunn on 29 Nov 1883 in Iowa
  • Died: 13 May 1943, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa at age 87
  • Buried: Walnut Hill Cemetery, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa
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bullet  Noted events in her life were:

Census, 1885, Iowa, Pottawattamie County, Council Bluffs Ward 1, Image 10 of 130. Age 29 yrs.

Census, 1900, Iowa, Pottawattamie County, Council Bluffs City, Kane Township, Image 22 of 35. Age 44 yrs., mother of 1 child, 1 child living, mother and father born England.

Census, 1910, Iowa, Pottawattamie County, Council Bluffs City, Kane Township, Image 17 of 33. Age 54 yrs., married 28 yrs., mother of 2 children, 1 child living.

Census, 1920, Iowa, Pottawattamie County, Council Bluffs City, Kane Township, Image 5 of 49. Age 64 yrs.

Census, 1925, Iowa State Census, Pottawattamie County, Council Bluffs City, Ward 1, Image 562 of 684. Age 69 yrs., mother, widowed, born Utah.

Census, 1930, Iowa, Pottawattamie County, Council Bluffs City, First Ward, Image 10 of 50. Age 74 yrs., widow, mother & father born England.

Obituary: Council Bluffs Daily Nonpareil, 14 May 1943, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa. MRS. EMMA GUNN, 87, 527 Damon Street, resident of Council Bluffs 79 years and who has often related tales of the city's early history, died Thursday. She was the widow of W.G. Gunn for whose parents Gunn School at North Broadway and Linden Avenue was named. Mrs. Gunn was the mother-in-law of George Henderson, former city clerk, now in the army.

Born in Salt Lake City Utah, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Rogers, she left that city in a covered wagon when 7 years old with her parents arriving in Council Bluffs in 1863. The Indians that roamed the hills around Council Bluffs many years ago were mostly all beggars she once related in an interview.

Her mother died when Emma was 8 years old, leaving daughter and her brother, Will, for Mr. Rogers to support. Once her father went to work leaving the children by themselves to look after the house. Mrs. Gunn was firing the stove when a large Indian squaw poked her head in the doorway, Frightened by the sudden appearance of the Indian, Mrs. Gunn, then not yet 10 years old, picked up a chunk of wood and hurled it at the invader. It struck the squaw in the stomach and the Rogers home was no longer bothered by the Indian squaw.

As her father was away from home a great deal of the time, Indians would frequently come to the Rogers home and pester the children. The Indians would peak in the windows to see how many were home before knocking at the door and beg food and clothing. Afraid of the Indians, Mrs. Gunn once related that she would make her brother, Will, get into bed and then she would point to the bed and tell the Indians that Will had smallpox. Frightened by the disease, the "red men" would disband and scatter in very little time.

During the trip across the plains from Utah to Council Bluffs an Indian fell in love with her mother practically demanding that he take Mrs. Rogers for his wife. After fast-talking and other "powerful means" Mr. Rogers convinced the "red man" that he, Rogers, was the rightful possessor of the "pretty squaw."

Mrs. Gunn is survived by her daughter, Mrs. George Henderson, two grandchildren and three great grandchildren. Burial will be in Walnut Hill Cemetery.

Council Bluffs Daily Nonpareil, May 14, 1943


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Emma married Walter Wharton Gunn, son of Levi Gunn and Nancy Grosvenor, on 29 Nov 1883 in Iowa. (Walter Wharton Gunn was born on 15 Feb 1855 in Schohaire County, New York, died on 14 Jan 1922 in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa and was buried in Walnut Hill Cemetery, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa.)



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